Job Titles vs. Occupation: What Job Seekers Need to Know

Job seekers often think they have to search for their dream careers in a certain way, such as only looking for a specific right fit or conducting a very focused search. However, by tailoring your search too much, are you missing out on great opportunities?

Many job seekers look for jobs by either searching for job titles or by searching for occupational categories. Let’s look at the difference:

Job titles

Some job seekers believe that they need to search for a career using job titles, such as “marketing executive,” “social media manager,” or “vice president of sales.” Though this may be a great way to find opportunities, you have to remember this important fact: Many employers are thinking of their needs, not yours. An employer may put that marketing executive job under the management category, as opposed to something that would reflect the title better. Consequently, by only searching using job titles, you’re likely to miss out on an opportunity that would interest you.

Occupation

Conversely, searching by occupational categories is a much better way to perform your job search. Sure, searching by job titles can narrow your search. However, it could narrow it too much. As stated in the previous example, you could be losing out on excellent opportunities because you simply aren’t seeing them.

By searching by occupation, you not only get to see more opportunities, you also get to see a wider variety of employers, locations, etc. Further, you may even realize that a job you thought you would be the right fit for you is actually not your cup of tea.

For example, say you are searching for a job in the financial sector. Instead of searching for “financial analyst,” try looking at broader categories, like business and financial operations. There are also resources out there that can help you do this, like EmploymentPipeline.com. We allow job seekers to use our “Occupation Pipeline” widget, a unique tool which enables users to perform broader searches by sourcing occupations and employers, rather than job titles. So, job seekers can find the right fit by looking at more options, which not only makes them happy, but also gives employers better candidates.

How do you search for a job? Do you search by job titles or occupation?

About Mary Marino

Mary Marino is the founder of EmploymentPipeline.com, a job search resource. EmploymentPipeline.com has launched its “Occupation Pipeline” widget, a unique tool which enables users to search employment opportunities by sourcing occupations and employers, rather than job titles. Connect with Mary at EmploymentPipeline.com or on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

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One Response to Job Titles vs. Occupation: What Job Seekers Need to Know

  1. ASABA SELEVEST March 2, 2015 at 3:59 pm #

    looking for hotel job

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